The Information Age

myspace.com

In 2003, Tom Anderson and Chris DeWolfe created myspace.com out of a disagreement with friendster’s usability. Anderson and DeWolfe designed their page to allow for both pseudonyms and real names. Friendster had only allowed real names. Myspace also did not require an invite to join. Anderson designed  the site to include games, a horoscope feature, and blogging capabilities. Myspace grew to become one of the most popular social networks in the United States. Myspace drastically improved the users experience and increased the amount of information and content that could be uploaded by these users.

 

For other breakthroughs in social networking, see:

  1. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/21/first-coffee-house-in-england/
  2. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/15/sixdegrees-com/
  3. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/15/friendster-com/
  4. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/15/linkedin-comd/
  5. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/18/facebook/ 
  6. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/18/twitter/

Source: David Kirkpatrick, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2011), 74-75.

Image Source: “Myspace Logo,” Myspace Press Room-Images, http://www.myspace.com/pressroom/2010/10/myspace-logos-2/ (accessed December 12, 2011).

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