The Information Age

Cave Paintings

In 35,000 B.C.E., nomadic tribes began painting pictures on the walls of caves describing animals or representing calendars or almanacs of some sort.  Most of the paintings were created to be viewed by certain people related or known to the painter, which is known as “invitational.”  Other paintings marked certain monuments or territories, and were called “public” paintings.  The last form of paintings were called “personal” because some painted small personal objects used like good luck charms.

For more discoveries in ancient communication, see:

  1. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/21/chinese-oracle-bone-script/
  2. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/21/djembe-drum/ ‎
  3. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/20/first-forms-of-fired-clay-tablets-used/
  4. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/20/images-and-carvings-on-walls-discovered/

 

Source: M. Hoover, Art of the Paleolithic and Neolithic Eras http://www.alamo.edu/sac/vat/arthistory/arts1303/palneo.htm (accessed September 21, 2011).

Image Source: “Cave Painting,” Oddee, http://www.oddee.com/_media/imgs/articles/a172_lascaux1.jpg (accessed December 24, 2011).

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