The Information Age

The Age of New Journalism

New journalism is a term given to a style of  journalism starting with the publication of “In Cold Blood” (1959) by Truman Capote. Other notable writers in this category include: Norman Mailer and Hunter S. Thompson. The difference that marked this new form of journalism is that it was seldom found in newspapers but it was being published in magazines like “The New Yorker“, “The Atlantic Monthly“, and “Harper’s“.  The idea behind this movement was to borrow from fiction to sensationalize or embellish actual events.

 Truman Capote.

 

For more milestones in journalism, see:

  1. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/07/acta-diurna-the-first-daily-gazette/
  2. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/18/weekly-gazettes-distributed-in-venice/
  3. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/19/yellow-journalism/
  4. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/19/the-rise-of-newspapers/
  5. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/19/muckrakers-and-investigative-journalism/
  6. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/20/cnn-ireport-founded/

 

Source:  MichaelWood, “Review of The New Journalism by Tom Wolfe,” New York Times, June 22, 1973, http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/11/08/specials/wolfe-journalism.html (accessed October 10, 2011).

Image Source: PBS, “Truman Capote,” American Masters, http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/truman-capote/introduction/58/ (accessed October 10, 2011).

 

 

 

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