The Information Age

Dr. E.F.W. Alexanderson demonstrates moving pictures via radio

Alexanderson would remain in the spotlight for announcing other television first happenings. The New York Times enthusiastic promulgation of the “first” would become standard in television’s history. When Alexanderson displayed his new devices, he had two, two and a half inch screens one of which would be used for public addresses over radio and another which would conceivably accompany the telephone. Herbert Hoover declared that “Human genius has now destroyed the impediment of distance in a new respect…” (as seen in Fisher, 64-65).

 

For other milestones in the development of television, see:

  1. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/06/first-use-of-the-word-television/
  2. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/iconoscope/
  3. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/first-demonstration-of-colored-television-in-the-united-states/
  4. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/first-successful-test-of-the-dissector-tube/
  5. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/farnsworth-transmits-first-recognizable-image/
  6. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/21/philo-farnsworth-demonstrates-the-first-electric-television/

 

Source: David E. Fisher and Marshall Jon Fisher, Tube: Invention of the Television (Washington, DC: Counterpoint, 1996), 64-65.

Image Source: “Dr. E.F.W. Alexanderson,” Smithsonian Science Service, http://scienceservice.si.edu/2478/012014.jpg (accessed December 14, 2011).

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