The Information Age

First successful test of the Dissector Tube

Philo Farnsworth tested his tube at his lab in San Francisco. Together with his team, he transmitted an image of a simple square that he asked his lab assistants to rotate. His journal reflected a calm response to what at the time was a major success. He had developed an essential component of the electronic television. They “sent a wire to Gorell in Los Angeles: THE DAMNED THING WORKS!”  (Fisher, 250-252). Clearly, there was at least some excitement.

 

For other milestones in the development of television, see:

  1. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/06/first-use-of-the-word-television/
  2. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/iconoscope/
  3. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/dr-e-f-w-alexanderson-demonstrates-moving-pictures-via-radio/
  4. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/first-demonstration-of-colored-television-in-the-united-states/
  5. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/farnsworth-transmits-first-recognizable-image/
  6. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/21/philo-farnsworth-demonstrates-the-first-electric-television/

 

Source: David E. Fisher and Marshall Jon Fisher, Tube: Invention of the Television (Washington, DC: Counterpoint, 1996), 250-252.

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