The Information Age

Beginning of Multi-Sponsored Broadcasting

In the late 1950s and early 60s, FM Radio began to become more popular due to a new generation of listeners who wanted to hear more music and less variety show programs that they could see on TV.  This ended companies sponsoring hour or half hour long shows and instead marked the beginning on multi-sponsored radio broadcasting.  Now, several corporations can advertise their products through 30 to 60 second radio advertisements multiple time throughout the day on as many radio stations as they want.  For more information see http://rbaver.umwblogs.org/2011/12/15/radio-broadcasting-commercials-throughout-the-20th-century/.

Pre-Multi Sponsored Radio Broadcasting Commercials

From the 1920s when commercials first started being broadcasted across radio frequencies to the 1950s, companies feared that direct sponsorship and promotion of products and services would alienate listeners.  Therefore, companies indirectly advertised products to listeners through sponsored programs.  With the advent of FM Radio, things started to change.  For more information see http://rbaver.umwblogs.org/2011/12/15/radio-broadcasting-commercials-throughout-the-20th-century/.

Edward Murrow and The Radio

http://infoage.umwblogs.org/2011/09/28/edward-murrow-and-the-radio/

First Commercial

In August (day unknown) 1922, WEAF broadcasted the first paid-for commercial announcement. Seeing it as an extension of toll telephone operation, AT&T entered into broadcasting publicizing this first commercial.

Source: Christopher H. Sterling and John Michael Kittross,  Stay Tuned: A History of American Broadcasting (Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers, 2002), 751.

Image Source: “WEAF Commerical Broadcast,” AT&T Historyhttp://www.corp.att.com/history/images/milestone_1922.jpg (accessed December 14, 2011).

President Eisenhower opens news conference to television coverage

Despite his opening the news conference to television coverage, Eisenhower required security to check all film taken. The White House would later release the film back to the broadcasting companies after approving the footage.

Exact date unknown

Source: Christopher H. Sterlingand John Michael Kittross, Stay Tuned: A History of American Broadcasting (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers, 2002), 758.

Image Source: “Eisenhower on Television,” Truthquakehttp://truthquake.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Eisenhower-President-Dwight-farewell-address-warns-warning-new-world-order-military-industrial-complex-congressional-tv-1961-50-year-anniversary.jpg (accessed December 14, 2011).

Coast-to-Coast Radio Program

In February (day unknown) 1924, using WEAF as the originating station, the first coast to coast radio program aired. It laid the groundwork for a national AT&T network as it demonstrated that the use of telephone line circuits was possible across the country.

Source:  Christopher H. Sterling and John Michael Kittross, Stay Tuned: A History of American Broadcasting (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers, 2002), 752.

Image Source: Dr. Charles Francis Jenkins, “Pioneer Television Inventor Opens New Radio Movie Broadcasting Station / Underwood & Underwood, Washington,” Library of Congress, http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/92511766/ (accessed September 22, 2011).

First commercial synchronous communications satellite, Early Bird, goes into orbit

This satellite system would contact European and United States television. It also represented the first in a series of ever more sophisticated satellites from NASA. Satellites would put a dent in the monopoly certain companies, like Bell, had in communication technology.

Exact date unknown

Source: Christopher H. Sterling and John Michael Kittross, Stay Tuned: A History of American Broadcasting (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers, 2002), 411, 760.

Iconoscope Patent

In 1923 (month and day unknown), Dr. Vladamir Zworykin patented his iconoscope camera tube which was most influential to the electrical television system. The iconoscope was a device that was able to scan and project images onto the screen of the television. It was used in a new approach to television, shifting from a mix of electrical and mechanical to just electrical.

For other milestones in the development of television, see:

  1. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/06/first-use-of-the-word-television/
  2. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/dr-e-f-w-alexanderson-demonstrates-moving-pictures-via-radio/
  3. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/first-demonstration-of-colored-television-in-the-united-states/
  4. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/first-successful-test-of-the-dissector-tube/
  5. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/22/farnsworth-transmits-first-recognizable-image/
  6. http://infoagetimeline.umwblogs.org/2011/09/21/philo-farnsworth-demonstrates-the-first-electric-television/

 

Source: Christopher H. Sterling and John Michael Kittross, Stay Tuned: A History of American Broadcasting (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers, 2002), 751.

1st Radio Conference

In February (day unknown) 1922, President Hoover hosted the first radio conference in Washington, D.C. During this conference, Sterling states Hoover called for “government regulation of the radio, limited advertising and classes based on kind of service”.

Source: Christopher Sterling and John Michael Kittross, Stay Tuned: A History of American Broadcasting (Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers, 2002), 751.

Image Source: Theodor Horydczak, “Mr. Hoover, President Hoover with his dog,” Library of Congress, 1929-1933, http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/thc1995001555/PP/ (accessed September 22, 2011).

Federal government halts growth of television stations

The freeze stopped stations from acquiring new channels and filing news patents. Officially this meant that any patent filed for television was considering “pending”. The government froze the creation of new stations in order to create legislature for properly regulating new stations. This freeze also affected the growth of radio stations. Once the freeze lifted, television stations jumped in number, and development proceeded unimpeded.

Source: Christopher H. Sterling and John Michael Kittross, Stay Tuned: A History of American Broadcasting (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers, 2002), 279, 321.

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